@luxinteraction

Last week during an internal brainstorming about the future roadmap of the retail SaaS offering we have been working on, our founder-CEO implored me to visualize and bring to life the imminent “future of shopping”. Amongst other things, he started to picture our typical customer wearing a headset, head back and waving hands in the air to navigate the products showcased in 3D!

Our brainstorming led to discussions around the poster children of cutting-edge retail transformational technology — Virtual Reality (VR) and Augmented Reality (AR). While the opportunities sounded very exciting, we had to take a reality check before committing…


Thank you for this! Here are a couple skills, one each under "Soft" and "Formal" that I have found to be very helpful in developing your career and craft.

Soft Skills

=

Presentation - Sometimes how you present and talk about your solution becomes more important than the solution itself. And this is where I find a lot of UX designers not doing enough justice to their talent. Whether it's presenting to clients, management or peers in design and development teams, they must develop the skills to engage their audience and absorb feedback without getting defensive.

Formal:

=

Motion Design…


Basic and simple, right? No!

I don't know what it is but I often come across seasoned candidates vying for Senior Design manager positions who believe it's almost fashionable not to be "over prepared" - So they will act clumsy, stressed and almost too busy to be bothered about doing this interview :) Statements like "I have been too busy to spend time updating my portfolio" ... or .... "I couldn't pull together the data to talk about how this improved the user's experience or business's bottom line"

Argh!


If someone starting up was to take one thing out of your article, i would suggest this little nugget of wisdom right here. Some platforms value "substance", and some are all about "style" - and very rarely do they tend to overlap. So yeah, context is everything!


Yeah, let us all take this with a pinch of salt. Since this is built and backed by Google, it has received a ton of PR already, and thousands of students, junior and mid-level executives are lapping it up in the hope of "cracking" Google.

On their part, Google will have the luxury to pick a handful of profiles from the avalanche of certificates and resumes they will surely get. So while I am with you in acknowledging all the positives you listed about this bootcamp, it is not a replacement for skills developed over time during deeper learning or onthe job training.


One of the few articles I have come across who go a step beyond simply suggesting to build a "personal brand" and give real, practical advice on how to go about doing this.

I am inspired enough to refresh and relook at who I am and what I have built over the last 20 years with a fresh set of eyes :)


This is my biggest pet peeve with designers' resumes! The tools they all feel proud of claiming to know, can all be learnt on YouTube over a few weekend sessions, so really I dont know of any design leader who will put any value to it.


I really liked how you articulated the recommendations . It might have been useful to include links to a few portfolios that you've liked over others, or even to show mistakes you pointed or fixed in some of your students' portfolios.

But I guess you want to leave some of the insight for the course you want to promote!


I am based in India and we have taken to this in a BIG way. The Govt has put in a massive effort to build an open payment platform over the last couple of years which a lot of startups have used to gain traction amongst users and small business owners.

Buying groceries from the local "kirana" shops to paying for a short tuktuk ride are all possible with a quick QR scan, instead of card swipes or haggling with cash and change!


I see this as the crux of the problem.

Even with all the increased awareness of UX & Design being a significant contributor towards building successful businesses, as amplified by the coverage companies like Apple, AirBnB and Instagram received and later software/tech behemoths like Microsoft and Google finally starting to look at Design seriously, we are STILL nowhere near an ideal proportion between engineers and designers in most teams. I guess with 90% of startups fizzling out in the first 12 months of launch, this does get reflected in the product that they put out for their audience.

Adit Kohli

Designer, Growth Marketer & Product Leader

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